Prepping for Online Learning

I’ve written a bunch of very brief blog posts over the years about the flipped classroom, including flipped units; I think I even have a “canned” flipped lesson teachers can customize.

Flipped learning IS different from online learning, but not that different.

As educators prepare for the unknown, it is very scary to have to prep for online teaching without knowing if what you create will be valuable, used, or ever used again. If you are in a situation where you have to prep for teaching units online, I recommend creating the units in a way that they can be used as flipped or blended learning opportunities when things normalize again.

https://englishtechie.com/2018/02/20/flipped-learning-workshop/

My advice is don’t purposely try to NOT do a good job. Try to create something lasting that you can use in the future, that is a learning resource for your students. Make it something that is reflective of the high quality instruction that takes place in your classroom and leverage the technology to make it happen. Learn from your colleagues and ask for help. It doesn’t have to be perfect but you can continue to be awesome in an alternative environment.

If you need help I am available! Just ask. We are all in this together.

Interviewing Ken Burns

As second interview, as part of a Virtual Professional Learning Series, will be live on April 29th!

This was such a cool opportunity. His perspectives on history are phenomenal but I love how he helps connect history to current events and circumstances. Also check out Unum, hosted by PBS. https://www.pbs.org/kenburns/unum/ David will soon have posted great questions connecting content to AP US History and I wrote several to help students with AP Language and Composition.

Podcasting for Ed

I was a last-minute fill in for a small conference section on using podcasts in the classroom this past Saturday. The conference organizers contacted me about a week before and asked if I was available to teach something and, of course, I said yes. I’d actually taught podcasting to other educators before… back in 2011. A lot has changed since then!

I had a great time using a little bit of my old information, plus a lot of my old podcasts that I had created, or my students had created, that were all still saved in my Google Drive.

I used podcasts as a method of content delivery for students. As part of a unit on Walden I realized there was information I wanted students to know and apply, but didn’t want to use class time for short lectures. Instead I chose to record short podcasts to encourage note-taking/active listening and be able to reach students even if they are absent during the week. This was my first foray into a flipped classroom and podcasts are still a great alternative to screencasting for flipped and blended learning.

Here’s the site I created to house information for my attendees: http://podcasted.us

And here’s my presentation:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1OOg9m3SwdwSh-H5S36bTGk7wYcNyxkfN_9cbCyRjcYM

Love connections (through tech)

This was originally posted last Valentine’s Day!

I know a lot of people only see how technology wedges in between people, noting how groups will sit together and stare at devices rather than speaking. It’s a problem, I get it. But I am a proponent of using technology to bring people together, to see how it can be used to connect, and I love stories about how that happens.

I was lucky enough to catch a story on NPR’s Morning Edition with Rachel Martin and Newberry Award winner Kwame Alexander. Back in January, the segment asked teachers to share a prompt with students. It was just a simple “Love is…” but the show received responses from over 2,000 classrooms across the country.

And then… magic happened. Like he has in the past, Kwame Alexander wrote a crowdsourced/paella/casserole/GUMBO poem for Valentine’s Day. “‘Kids finding their voice and lifting it up, for love,’ he tells NPR. “Nothing more powerful than that.’”

From a simple prompt to a love poem for families, teachers, pets, movies, food, and expectations. This prompt, and this technology, a radio program, brought people together and made connections through words and feelings. It created a shared experience and published creation for students and teachers across the country.

Listen to the poem – or read it to your class – and see how your students connect to the writers and the common experiences.

Teaching during Black History Month

Black History Month can be a tough recognition to include in lessons, especially if you are not black. This evening I am hosting a Twitter chat for #akedchat on this topic so we can discuss how to include Black History lessons in our instruction year round, not just during February. Here are some resources for getting started, and doing it right. The first, Teaching Tolerance, helped me create the questions for this evening’s chat.

https://www.tolerance.org/magazine/dos-and-donts-of-teaching-black-history

http://www.nea.org/tools/lessons/black-history-month.htm

https://alaskapublic.pbslearningmedia.org/collection/black-history-collection/

Digital Gallery Walk

Sample Slide – there is room for different kinds of feedback for different editorial purposes.

A Gallery Walk is a structured discussion during which small groups rotate and respond to prompts or questions posted around the classroom.

There’s nothing quite like a gallery walk to get students up, moving, reading, evaluating, and collaborating to assist others. But what if you are moving toward a paperless classroom? Or want to keep a better record of the work that was done? Or have some other unique situation?

It’s easy to move the gallery walk that you would have completed on paper to Google Slides.

In one slideshow, create a slide for each group. In the middle the group can add their thesis/topic/discussion question or whatever needs to be peer reviewed. Off to the sides, create a “Glow” and a “Grow” text box so reviewers can tell what they like and what could change. Finally, add a text box that allows reviewers to give suggestions for how the thesis/topic/discussion question should read.

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1q8tij486WdrR2EBe5wnOf3kGZoxl7Ez828DcAB2wjzs/copy